Syllabus2010 Fall Edu523E

 

      EDU 523E  FALL 2010 CALENDAR 

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION

 

WED. 1240-320                                              Dr. R. Michael Smith

Abate School                                                               Office Phone   716-286-8591                                                    Office ACAD 325D                                         Home Phone   716-284-4263

Office Hrs.                                                      Office E-mail  msmith@niagara.edu                 

Monday 10-12 Noon                                                           sites.niagara.edu (go to this site and click on

Tuesday 10-Noon                                                                my name for course updates)

Wednesday 4-6 pm                                                              Student Learn and Serve at Abate Wed. mornings

 

WED. SEPT. 1                                                            WED. SEPT. 8                                                      

Introductions/Syllabus/Pictures/S.P.G.                            Technology/Research/APA discussion

Group development (pairs) Get photo ID                         Autobiography due (keep copy for L&S teacher)

HW Complete classroom mgmt inventory st#9              Read chapter 1 & do questions for next class

Discuss/create Professionalism rubric                             Assign ethnic profiles

Discuss Gardner’s MI and exit slips                                 PBS video 11-1130 and 1215-1245 Bring lunch

Bring 3-ring binder by Wed. for 1 bonus mark            Discuss academic honesty (plagiarism & cheating)

Discuss study abroad program and how to improve the L&S experience for all stakeholders      

SEPT. 15                                                             SEPT 22                                                           .                                                                 

Students work on their tech assignment                          Discuss chpt 2 questions.                 

Read ch 2 & do question summary for next class         Discuss Maslow and Bloom             

Discuss chapter 1 questions                                            Read chapter 3, 4, 5 & do questions for next class

PBS video 11-1130 and 1215-1245                                     PBS video 11-1130 and 1215-1245

Bring snacks/lunch                                                              Bring snacks/lunch

Review Motivation Chart st#5                                           Tech./Research Assignment Due/Peer Assisted  20

Students evaluate auto. and meet to discuss spg          Discuss ethnic profile and interview assignment

SEPT. 29                                                         _ OCT. 6                _                                             .

Discuss best Web sites and articles and email               Discuss Motivation Chart and Standards #5 and 9

corrected paper to Dr. Smith                                              Discuss chapter  6

Read chapter 6 for next class and do questions             Discuss portfolio submissions 5 & 9    

Discuss chapter 3,4,5                                                          Read chapter 7and do questions for next class

Discuss Banks approaches to M. Ed.                               Quiz on chapters for bonus marks                      

OCT. 13                                                          OCT. 20                                               _____ 

Ethnic profile due 10 marks                                       Read C. C.intro- p36 text for next class and do questions

Discuss chapter 7                                                               Interview Due 10 marks

Read chapter 8 & 9 and do questions                              Discuss chapters 8 & 9

OCT 27                                                           NOV. 3                                  _____                    .

Discuss C.C TEXT  intro- p 36                                           Discuss CC  TEXT p 37-72

 Read CC p 37-72  and do questions                  Read CC p 74-106 and do questions

Discuss interviews

NOV. 10                                                            NOV. 17                                                           .              

Discuss CC TEXT p 74-106                                                Discuss  CC TEXT p 107- 168                                           

Read CC p 107- 168 and do questions                              Read CC p 169-230 and do questions  

Submit motivation chart 10 marks             

DEC. 1             ___________                          _   DEC. 8                                                                .

Read CC p 231- 263 and do questions                              Discuss  p 231- 263   

Discuss  p 169- 230                                                           MULTICULTURAL FOOD FESTIVAL 

Historical Position Paper/Quiz 15 marks

 

THIS IS A TENTATIVE SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT THE DISCRETION OF THE PROFESSOR

A.          Course Number and Title

EDU 523 – Foundations of Education

B.            Number of Credits

Three (3) credit hours

C.            Course Description

This course examines the ways in which diverse disciplines (e.g., history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, multiculturality, economics, ethics, law) are the bases upon which Western educational practices are built. These interconnected foundations continuously shape school characteristics and conditions including curriculum, pedagogy, classroom organization, technology and the expectations held of teachers, students, parents, administrators, and the community. Course experiences will involve prospective teachers in gaining knowledge with which to analyze the effects of these educational foundations on the school experience in the past and present. Prospective teachers will use their evolving foundational framework to examine educational paradigms, theories, and practices that either strengthen and expand the democratic possibilities of schooling or maintain the current correspondence between educational success and students’ socio-economic and cultural identities.

D.            Method of Teaching

This course is framed within a constructivist perspective that embraces the belief that knowledge is socially constructed.  Learning is viewed as a developmental process that is enhanced when students learn to view problems and issues from multiple perspectives, constructing knowledge from their own interpretations of numerous pieces of evidence.  Teaching approaches are directed toward open-ended inquiry, critical thinking and reflection, and social interaction.  Instructional methods will include whole class and small group discussion, individual and cooperative activities, presentations by instructors and classmates, Internet and library searches, observations of instructional videos, field experiences, and research

E.             Course Objectives

Prospective teachers will:

1.  develop an evolving philosophy of education;

2.  identify similar and changed education practices over the past century;

3.  explore a range of pedagogical practices;

4.  describe an open and respectful relationship with students and families;

5.  identify historical, legal, ethical, economic, multicultural, psychological, 

                     social, and philosophical principles related to educational theories and practices;

6.  identify ways in which educational inequalities limit teaching and learning;

7.  explore curriculum that includes and accurately represents diverse cultures and groups;

8.  develop an evolving knowledge of teachers’ professional roles and   responsibilities;

9.  access classroom applications of technology and library resources; and

10. examine and evaluate a variety of purposes of education.

 

Program Standards

Prospective teachers will discuss and show evidence of meeting the following program portfolio standards:

INTASC Standard 5. Motivation and Management

The candidate encourages an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interactions, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

                INTASC Standard 9. Professional Development

The candidate is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (students, parents, and other professional) and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.

 

 F. Outline of Course Content 

 

Chapter 1 Teaching

Chapter 2  Today’s Teachers

Chapter 3  Today’s Schools

Chapter 4  Philosophical Foundations

Chapter 5  Historical Foundations

Chapter 6  Governance and Finance of Schools

Chapter 7  Ethical and Legal Issues

Chapter 8  Today’s Students 

Chapter 9  Learners’ Individual Needs

Chapter 10 Authentic Instruction

Chapter 11 Curriculum Standards and Assessment

Chapter 12 Integrating Technology

Chapter 13 Becoming a Professional Teacher

Other Topics to be Covered are:  Bloom’s Taxonomy, Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences, Banks’ Approaches to Multicultural Education, Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,  Teaching Models, Chinese Constitutions, and a Diagnostic Motivation Chart.  PBS Video on the Historical Foundations of Education.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS  

 

REQUIRED TEXTS 

Flynn, P., Mesibov, D., Vermette, P. J., & Smith, R. M. (2010).  Captivating classes with

constructivism:  Practical strategies for pre-service and in-service teachers. (3rd ed.).  Potsdam,

New York:  The Institute for Learning Centered Education.

 

Parkay, F. W. & Stanford, B. H. (2008). Becoming a teacher (8th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

 

Suggested Reading.

 Covey, S. R. (1990).  The seven habits of highly effective people.   New York: Fireside.

Spring, J. (2004). The intersection of cultures: Multicultural education in the United

States and the global economy (3rd ed).Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Banks, J. A. & Banks, C. M. (Eds.). (1997). Multicultural education: Issues and perspectives.

Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

 

Your assigned Ethnic Profile can be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.settlement.org/cp/english/index.html  Access your country and print it in the PDF format.

Ethnic Profiles (1998).  Toronto: Catholic Immigration Centre and The University of Toronto Press.

               

ASSIGNMENTS                 

A.                Class attendance and punctuality are mandatory.  Two absences will result in a reduction of 10 points, three will result in a reduction of 20 points, and four or more will result in a failing grade.           

B.                Complete assigned readings as scheduled and actively engage in classroom discussions. 

C.                All class activities and assignments are to be completed as directed.

                Correct spelling, punctuation and grammar account for 20% on all papers.

D.            Autobiography  15 marks

E.             Technology Assignments 20 marks 

F.             Ethnic Profile 10 marks

G.            Interview 10 marks

H.            Motivation Chart  10 marks

I.              Historical Position Paper/Quiz  15  marks

J.            Chapter summaries/Question Development 5 x2 = 10 marks

K.            Professionalism 10 marks

L.            Complete requirements of Learn and Serve Duration of Semester

               

         TOTAL IS 100 MARKS        

AUTOBIOGRAPHY 15 marks

Each student is responsible for completing and submitting this assignment by the second class.  It is to be typed, double-spaced, written in the first person, and should not exceed four pages in length, including the cover page.  It is to be a brief personal history that includes the following subheadings:

your ethnic, SES, and geographic background; family information that you are comfortable sharing;

your hobbies and interests ( musical, artistic, athletic, etc.); honours and awards you have received;

your experiences teaching or volunteering; your education level (subject areas, schools attended etc.)

places you have travelled; jobs you have held; languages you can speak and degree of fluency; experience with special needs/gifted students; favourite subjects and grade level you would prefer to teach.  Keep a corrected copy to give to your teachers at the beginning of your L&S and TA Placements.

Grading Outline

The paper must be cohesive (you can list the subheadings in bold) and include the following:

·         Typed, stapled, double-spaced, 12 point Arial font with a cover page, 4 pages in length, with 5 or less typos, spelling mistakes, punctuation or grammatical errors. Write in the first person. (3)

·         Describe the 11 subheadings listing above (11)

·         Concluding paragraph of what you would like to learn in this class with regard to foundations of education. (1)

Rationale

The autobiography assignment will serve two primary purposes.  1. It will allow me to better understand each student and his/her needs, goals and aspirations, thus facilitating communication during the term. 2. I will share this information with your Learn and Serve teachers so that they can utilize your skills in the most effective manner and have a knowledge of your abilities and interests.  This exercise will also encourage students to reflect on their experiences, understand their paradigms, and apply this knowledge to the development of their personal philosophy of education. 

               

TECHNOLOGY/RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT  20 marks

Search the Internet for appropriate articles and Web sites related to current issues in education.  Students can work in pairs if 16-23 students, or groups of three if enrolment is 24 or more.  If less than twelve  students, we may have each student research only one topic and cite eight articles with annotations.  

Grading Outline

Part A (10 marks) An annotated bibliography (APA style) of 16 EBSCOhost articles.  Use only Academic Search Premier database. The articles must be current (2000 to present) and 2 for each of the following topics:  Motivation, Reflective Practice, School/University Partnerships, Mentoring Programs, Study Abroad Programs, Community Service, Learn and Serve, and Sabbaticals/Leaves. 

·         Correct APA citation of 16 articles. (4)

·         Annotations (use complete sentences- no more than 6 sentences ) for each of the 16 articles. (4)

·         Correct spelling, punctuation, grammar. (2)

Part B (10 marks) An annotated list of 16 excellent Web sites that deal with the above topics. 

  • Correct APA citation of 16 Web sites. (4)

·         Annotations (use complete sentences- no more than 6) for each of the 16 Web sites. (4)

·         Correct spelling, punctuation, grammar, and APA Style (6th ed.) (2)

Rationale

The Internet can be an invaluable asset for students.  (It is also free to students using Niagara's computer facilities)  It is my intention to familiarize students with this resource tool and allow them to explore new Web sites.  All students will be instructed in Internet and EBSCOhost (journal database) procedures using Microsoft Internet Explorer and Netscape, both on and off campus.

 

ETHNIC PROFILE 10 marks

This activity will allow prospective teachers to demonstrate their ability to understand and accommodate a particular cultural group. Cultural profiles from Canadian immigration can be accessed at http://www.settlement.org/cp/english/index.html

Grading Outline

The paper must be cohesive and include the following:

·         Typed, double-spaced, 12 point Arial font, 4 pages in length, stapled, with cover sheet and completed in first person narrative with 5 or less typos, spelling mistakes, punctuation or grammatical errors. (2)

·         A brief condensation of the material you deem to be most relevant to teaching. (4)

·         A summary of how you would utilize this information so that you could effectively teach a child from this particular culture. Write this in the first person. (4)

Rationale

Prospective teachers can gain knowledge of various cultures and implement strategies so that their students can experience the benefits of diversity.

·         ** If the Edu 528 professor has assigned a similar assignment, this will be changed to researching jobs in the assigned countries.

 

INTERVIEW  10 marks

Conduct an interview (focusing on current educational issues) with a person of your choice and submit a narrative paper of your findings.  

Grading Outline

The paper must be cohesive and include the following:

·         typed, double-spaced, stapled, 12 point Arial font, 4 pages in length including cover page, and narrative format with 5 or less typos, spelling mistakes, punctuation or grammatical errors;(2)

·         the most important things a teacher should do;(2)

·         dscription of your findings with regard to: student motivation, experiences with cultural or gender bias, and preferred teaching strategies; (4) and

·         a summary of what you have learned and how you plan to implement this information (2)

Rationale

This exercise will provide you with “real life” insights into diversity, how it affects a student’s motivation and behavior, and what you can do to facilitate learning.

                 

FINAL EXAM

 (Historical Position Paper/Quiz)

It will be discussed in class. The assignment is worth 15 marks. 

(Diagnostic Motivation Chart)  10 marks.  Students will create 24 Functional Strategies - 4 for each of the 6 primary motivation factors.

 

CHAPTER QUIZ DEVELOPMENT   5X2=10 marks

Throughout the semester, you will develop CHAPTER QUIZZES for each assignmed reading .  Five will be randomly collected at the start of class and graded.  No late submissions will be accepted, and if the prospective teacher is going to be absent or late for class for whatever reason, he or she must email the assignment to the instructor before the start of class.  

Grading Outline

·         Each of the 5 chapter quizzes is worth 2 marks each.

·         Develop and type in a test format, five true/false questions based on the chapter (1 mark).

·         Develop and type in a test format, five multiple choice questions based on the chapter (1 mark).

Rationale

This assignment will ensure that prospective teachers will read the assigned text and attend class prepared to discuss the chapter material. 

 

PROFESSIONALISM  10 marks

The class will develop the rubric for professionalism.  The following is an example:

Grading Outline

  • Attendance
  • Punctuality
  • Respect for others
  • Talking in turn
  • Prepared and contributes in class (also no texting, emailing or facebook during class)

Each of these 5 are worth 2 marks each.

 

This is a tentative calendar and syllabus subject to change at the discretion of the instructor.    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 GRADES FOR ASSIGNMENTS

98-100  A+,   94-97   A,  91-93 A-,  88-90  B+,  84-87 B,  81-83  B-,    78-80  C+,  74-77  C,  71-73  C-,     68-70  D+,  64-67  D,   61-63  D-,       Below 60- Fail

 

Twenty per cent (20%) of the total mark for each assignment will be based on spelling, punctuation, grammar, sentence structure, proper APA style etc.  Therefore it is in your best interest to proof read (in addition to your computer's spell check and grammar check) each assignment before submitting.

 

Bibliography

 

Banks, J. A. (2003). Teaching strategies for ethnic studies (7th ed.). Boston: Allyn and

Bacon.

Banks, J. A. & Banks, C. M. (Eds.). (1997). Multicultural education: Issues and perspectives. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Covey, S. R. (1990). The seven habits of highly effective people. New York: Fireside.

Foster, M. (1997). Black teachers on teaching. New York: The New Press.

Freire, P. (1970). The pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Seabury Press.

Gay, G. (2000). Cultural responsive teaching, theory, research, and practice. New    

                York: Teachers College Press.

Grant, C. A. and Ladson-Billings, G. (Eds.) (1997). Dictionary of multicultural

education. Phoenix, AR: Oryx Press.

Goodwin, S. and Swartz, E. (1993). Multiculturality: Liberating classroom pedagogy and

practice.  Raising Standards, Journal of the Rochester Teachers’ Association, 1(1), 19-33.

Gordon, B.  M. (1986). The use of emancipatory pedagogy in teacher education.

Journal of Educational Thought , 20(2), 59-66.

Ladson-Billings, G. (1994). The dreamkeepers, successful teachers of African

American children. San  Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

McNergney, R. F., & Herbert, J. M. (2001). Foundations of education: The challenge of professional practice (3rd ed.). Massachusetts: Allyn and Bacon.

Nieto, S. (1999). The light in their eyes, creating multicultural learning communities. New York: Teachers College Press.

Spring, J. (2004). American education (11th ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill.

 

Academic Honesty

The integrity of an academic community necessitates the full and correct citation of ideas, methodologies, and research findings. In addition, each student can promote academic honesty by protecting his or her work from inappropriate use. Academic honesty is essential to ensure the validity of the grading system and to maintain a high standard of academic excellence.  The principal violations of academic honesty are cheating and plagiarism.

Cheating includes the unauthorized use of certain materials, information, or devices in writing examinations, or in preparing papers or other assignments. Any student who aids another student in such dishonesty is also guilty of cheating.  Other possible forms of cheating include submitting the same work in more than one class without permission

Plagiarism is the presentation of ideas, words, and opinions of someone else as one’s own work.  Paraphrased material, even if rendered in the student’s own words, must be attributed to the originator of the thought.

Please refer to the undergraduate catalogue for Niagara University’s policy on cheating, plagiarism, procedures and penalties.

Students with disabilities

Students with documented disabilities who may need accommodations, who have any emergency medical information the instructor should know of, or who need special arrangements in the event of an evacuation, should make an appointment with the instructor as early as possible in the semester, preferably no later than the first week of the semester.  Students must also register with Diane Stoelting, Coordinator of Specialized Support Services (286-8076, ds@niagara.edu) in order to facilitate the provision of needed accommodations.

Counseling Services and Academic Support

The strains and workload of student life can sometimes feel overwhelming and it is easy to lose perspective when faced with academic, social, and personal demands. The staff of the office of counseling services in the lower level of Seton Hall and the Academic Support staff in the Learning Center in Seton Hall are here to help students manage the stresses of university life.  All private consultations are confidential and free of charge.  Appointment can be scheduled by calling 286-8536 (Counseling) or 286-8072 (Office of Academic Support).

 

The following Web sites will assist you in proper grammar usage.

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/

http://k-6educators.about.com/msub138.htm

http://www.grammarbook.com/

 

Marco Polo is an excellent Web site used by many teachers. It can be accessed at the following address:

http://www.marcopolo-education.org/teacher/marcograms.aspx

 

Students are allowed to print (free of charge), 800 single sheets of copies or 1600 if double-sided, per semester in the St. Vincent computer lab.

 

If you are looking for information about constructivism go to the Institute for Learning Centered Education at http://www.learnercentereded.org/

 

Revised May 1, 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historical Position Paper

 

This course is designed to develop the candidate’s professional knowledge of education as an evolving field based on changes in legal, ethical, economic, multicultural, psychological, social, and philosophical principles over time. To demonstrate this knowledge, candidates will develop a position paper on an historical issue that has significantly impacted education in Western society as it is today.  Candidates will identify an issue (ex. racial segregation of schools, religion in schools, gender discrimination in schools).  They will use research technologies including library search databases (ex. Ebscohost) to gather information on the history of this issue.  The position paper will describe the history including the prevailing philosophy of education (beliefs about teaching, learning, and development) at the time.  It will also document the major court cases, legislative, and philosophical changes that led to the current state of education on this issue. Finally, the paper will discuss how the candidate’s knowledge of this historical issue and the changes that have occurred over time will impact his/her teaching with special emphasis on how it will assist the candidate in creating a learning environment that encourages positive individual and group motivation and behavior, social interactions, and engagement in learning.

EDU 523 Historical Position Paper Rubric

 

Knowledge of Human Development and Learning

The candidate understands a variety of philosophical orientations toward teaching, learning, and development and how these orientations have changed over time.  (NCSS 1.4, 1.5)

The position paper illustrates a satisfactory understanding of less than 2 philosophical orientations toward teaching, learning, and development.

The position paper illustrates a satisfactory understanding of at least 2 philosophical orientations toward teaching, learning, and development.

The position paper illustrates a comprehensive understanding of a variety of philosophical orientations toward teaching, learning, and development.

Motivation and Management

Motivation

The candidate understands individual and group motivation strategies that encourage positive social interactions, active engagement in learning and self-motivation (NCSS 1.4, 1.5)

The position paper indicates that the candidate no specific plans for encouraging positive individual and group motivation and behavior, social interactions, and engagement in learning for students from diverse backgrounds.

The position paper indicates that the candidate understands and has 1-2  specific plans for encouraging positive individual and group motivation and behavior, social interactions, and engagement in learning for students from diverse backgrounds.

The position paper indicates that the candidate understands and has many specific plans for encouraging positive individual and group motivation and behavior, social interactions, and engagement in learning for students from diverse backgrounds.

 

Professional Development

 

History of Education

The candidate demonstrates an understanding of education as a profession grounded in legal, ethical, economic, multicultural, psychological, social, and philosophical changes over time. (NCSS 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.9, 1.10)

The position paper does not illustrate a satisfactory understanding of at least 2 schools of thought in education and the historical events that are associated with these philosophical orientations.

The position paper illustrates a satisfactory understanding of at least 2 schools of thought in education and the historical events that are associated with these philosophical orientations.

The position paper illustrates a comprehensive understanding of the schools of thought in education and the historical events that are associated with these philosophical orientations.

Reflection

The candidate reflects upon the historical events in education in order to develop culturally responsive curricula and instructional practices. . (NCSS 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.9, 1.10)

The position paper does not include information on how the candidate’s knowledge of historical events in education will contribute to establishing a classroom environment that is culturally responsive.

The position paper includes information on how the candidate’s knowledge of historical events in education will contribute to establishing a classroom environment that is culturally responsive.

The position paper includes information on how the candidate’s knowledge of historical events in education will contribute to establishing a classroom environment that is culturally responsive. Multiple, specific plans are outlined for future classroom practice.

General Program Expectations

Disposition

The Candidate demonstrates an understanding of, and compliance with, laws and policies at the local (e.g., university, college, program, etc.), state and national level.

 

The Candidate maintains high expectations for self and others. (NCSS 1.10)

The position paper does not illustrate that the candidate understands state/provincial and national laws. 

The position paper illustrates that the candidate understands and will comply with state/provincial and national laws. 

 

 

The position paper illustrates that the candidate has high expectations for all students.

 

 

 

Writing Conventions

The annotated bibliography and interview summary report follow standard writing conventions using appropriate grammar, spelling, syntax, and voice. APA style in citation and referencing is accurately used when appropriate.

The position paper does not follow standard writing conventions using appropriate grammar, spelling, syntax, and voice. Information is not referenced appropriately.

The position paper follows standard writing conventions using appropriate grammar, spelling, syntax, and voice.  A limited number of references and citations are included when appropriate.

The position paper demonstrates outstanding execution of standard writing conventions using appropriate grammar, spelling, syntax, and voice. Multiple references are appropriately included throughout the report.

Technology

The candidate uses technology to enhance productivity and professional practice. (NCSS 1.8)

Appropriate technologies are not used to organize and format the completed assignments.

Appropriate technologies are used to research, organize and format the completed assignments.